THAT WAS THEN THIS IS NOW BOOK

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S. E. Hinton is the author of a number of bestselling and beloved books for young adults, including THAT WAS THEN, THIS IS NOW; RUMBLE FISH, TEX, and of. THAT WAS THEN, THIS IS NOW [S. E. Hinton] on rasasoflaser.ml *FREE* shipping on "This is a daring, delightful, and transformative book." ―Arianna. That Was Then, This Is Now book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Does growing up have to mean growing apart?Since ch.


That Was Then This Is Now Book

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The book, like Rumble Fish, takes place in Tulsa, appears in That Was Then, This Is Now and even. Complete summary of S. E. Hinton's That Was Then, This Is Now. than that of The Outsiders, yet Hinton is even more programmatic in this second book. Teenagers love the gritty realism of this novel. Read Common Sense Media's That Was Then, This Is Now review, age rating, and parents guide.

This book is heartbreaking. I read it years ago and wanted to read it again. Want to know the reason why it took me years to read it again? Because I cried my eyes out when I finished it the first time, that it has taken me this long to be able to read it again. The heartbreak was still there when I reached the end, but it was a memory of the original heartbreak.

The characters are are very well developed making you feel everything they This book is heartbreaking. The characters are are very well developed making you feel everything they do, which I dont always find is possible with such short books, but it achieved completely here. It very raw in its emotions, and uncensored in censored kinda way. The lifestyle is one that is brutally harsh and often unpleasant to think about, but the author doesnt stoop to using lots of swear words though there are plenty of occasions when they are walked around.

Hinton gives you enough to help form the image she wants, but not enough to wreck the experience of using some of your own imagination. A small touch I really enjoyed about this book is that made me enjoy it just that little bit more, the setting is the same from The Outsiders and you get to see a glimpse of the old main character Ponyboy Curtis once again, but he doesnt take over the story. Its a great short read that will alter your soul.

View 1 comment. See, everyone's talking about how the ending is wonderfully dark and hopeless and brave in its horror. Well, I think it's bullshit. I think Mark is gorgeous inside and outside, and fearless and clever and slightly twisted and dead sexy, and I think Bryon is a flighty, selfish, irrational dick.

And I'm pissed about it. You know what I'd love right now?

I'd love to have a book about Mark. Just Mark. How he grew up and grew harder, what he felt for Bryon and the rest of the world, his reasons and his See, everyone's talking about how the ending is wonderfully dark and hopeless and brave in its horror.

How he grew up and grew harder, what he felt for Bryon and the rest of the world, his reasons and his ways. Fuck Bryon. Bryon is the younger, less impactful version of the classic inept middle-aged protagonist who exists just to show the lows humanity can get to or some such thing, and on a scale of one to any other character Hinton has written about he sucks balls, starting around halfway through the book and up until the very end.

It's a captivating story, I'll give Hinton that. Brotherhood, friendship and life in the hood are all touched with a delicate hand, and Hinton manages to convey what they mean and feel like without even needing to explicitly tell the reader about them. The great characters counterbalance the awful ones: I suppose it all sort of balances out, in the end - but this could have achieved greatness. There are good seeds. Bryon, my man, let me give you some anything-but-friendly advice: View all 12 comments.

Aug 17, Laura rated it liked it Shelves: Do yourself a favor and skip the crap movie with, um, one of the Estevez brothers, I forget which one.

This YA is actually pretty powerful, if rather bleak, because unlike the movie, the novel doesn't cop out by giving the audience a phony happy ending. View all 8 comments. May 17, Jacki rated it it was amazing Shelves: Every bit as punching no pun intended as The Outsiders, but with a much darker ending.

It was great to see cameos of the characters from The Outsiders.

ISBN 13: 9780140389661

The different perspective on Curtis was a nice touch. Hinton's writing style made a noticeable improvement.

Which is saying a lot. While she was fantastic in The Outsiders, this book made her points a lot more subtle with the exception of the titled line.

She made no great effort to foreshadow events, yet everything fell into a logical line o Every bit as punching no pun intended as The Outsiders, but with a much darker ending. She made no great effort to foreshadow events, yet everything fell into a logical line of consequences that can surprise you if you're not anticipating it. I also feel that the personal development of the characters was better portrayed than in The Outsiders. The ending broke my heart and threw out the pieces.

Favorite quotes: If you have one GOOD friend, you're more than lucky. You can hear some pretty neat stuff that way. To hate the person you love the best in the world. View all 5 comments. Oct 15, Lisa rated it really liked it. This was another joint read with my daughter.

She was pleased to see the reappearance of Ponyboy, but would have liked to have seen a bit more of him. It was fun to discuss with her the similarities and then contrast the differences of Bryon and Ponyboy.

Both were intelligent, got good grades, were from the poor side of town scraping to make ends meet, and clearly had good morals; pretty much. Yet unlike Ponyboy, Bryon is a player with the girls, self-assured and a risk taker. To be sure, they a This was another joint read with my daughter. To be sure, they are older now and Ponyboy has likely matured.

But at the last read, his self-image was weak and he was only just starting to believe in himself, his story. Hailey hated the ending. And was surprised when I told her this was good. This was life, reality, and that whether or not we like it change happens.

We're supposed to hate the ending. Change, for the most part, is supposed to make us uncomfortable at times, but it's how we adapt to us that helps us grow and learn as people. I love reading with my daughter and hope to continue with stories like these for years to come.

Mar 09, LemonLinda rated it really liked it. It really is amazing to me that this author, a female, can get into the head of a male teenager, to such a degree that she so completely reveals his thoughts, his actions, his justifications, his excuses, etc. In reading about the author, she said that as a teen she was not satisfied with what was available for her to read so she did something about it and as a consequence she wrote literature relevant to and for a young adult audience.

Of course, the frankness and bold honesty over the years h It really is amazing to me that this author, a female, can get into the head of a male teenager, to such a degree that she so completely reveals his thoughts, his actions, his justifications, his excuses, etc. Of course, the frankness and bold honesty over the years has not been so completely embraced and her books have been "taught in some schools and banned in others". Her target audience may be YA, but I contend that adults can also learn from and benefit from the honest dialogue of teens who are growing up in near poverty situations so that rather than reacting with judgement there can be an attempt for a deeper understanding.

Aug 31, Teri rated it it was amazing. I think I've read The Outsiders at least 6 times but strangely I've never read any other of Hinton's books until now.

Parents say

It's just as gritty and real as Outsiders but it's time period is set a bit later. Not too late for Ponyboy to make a cameo appearance though. It's fun even reading that name!

As a parent of a teenager and more on their way there it was a good reminder of all the crazy emotions of that age. My favorite part is C I think I've read The Outsiders at least 6 times but strangely I've never read any other of Hinton's books until now. My favorite part is Cathy crying to her father and saying, "You can't say, 'This is just a stage,' when it's important to people what they're feeling.

Maybe he will outgrow it someday, but right now it's important. View all 3 comments. What an emotional roller coaster. I remember reading this in high school, but I couldn't remember anything about the story.

Until almost the end of the book and then I knew everything. Ugh, what a mess it ended up being. Seems like more than one person lost their mind. Aug 28, Michael cook rated it it was amazing. Do you like gangs, drugs and hustling for money? This book is about the criminal life of 16 year old Bryon. Bryon and his best friend Mark used to spend most of their time pool hustling and mugging people.

Ever since they were kids they loved to fight. Almost every day they would mug people or hustle them in pool for money.

One night that completely changed for Bryon.

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Their good friend Charlie ran the bar they would hustle in. One night when Bryon and Mark were l Do you like gangs, drugs and hustling for money? Charlie came to the rescue just in time but got shot. The two friends stop seeing each other and begin to grow apart. This book grabbed me from the first page and drove me to read more.

Hinton did a great job with suspense and twists. Jun 09, Jennifer rated it really liked it.

This is a coming of age story about two best friends, and what happens to them when they start to mature and grow apart. It is a story about friendship, loyalty, and mostly how the difference between right and wrong is subjective. There is excellent character development, and although the book is short I finished it in a few hours by the end you feel for every character in the story, as if you really know them.

Recommended for anyone who liked The Outsiders. I read all 4 of her novels repeatedly for years. Then drooled over the casts of the movies. I felt a bit nostalgic when I noticed this audiobook at my library and immediately checked it out. I traveled back in time. Of course how I feel about the storyline now is not nearly as overpowering as it was 35 years ago, but I appreciated the flashback. Oct 17, Mike rated it it was ok Shelves: The Outsiders is one of the most important books in YA history.

I doubt it was the first book to portray poverty and gang violence among teenagers realistically, but it was the first to get popular, and it hugely expanded the boundaries of what books for kids could do, in a way that's never been done before or since.

With The Outsiders, Hinton paved the way for authors who took teenagers seriously as an audience to write about important issues. Well, they wouldn't be possible without Hinton's influence. Books can be influential without being good, but I'm happy to say that I did moderately enjoy The Outsiders.

It had its flaws, but it's a solid YA book, especially considering that Hinton was doing something she'd essentially never seen done before. So it made sense that it would be good to check out her follow-up.

That Was Then, This is Now Summary

This book didn't have the same popularity that The Outsiders did, but I still see it in used bookstores every once in a while. But, unfortunately, this turned out to be a far weaker book than The Outsiders.

I can see why this book wasn't as popular or acclaimed as The Outsiders - it's just not as impactful or well-written. The first problem is immediately irritating, from the opening pages of the book: Bryon is constantly telling us things about the other characters, rather than letting us see for ourselves.

This telling, rather than showing, is essentially how every character in the novel is constructed. It got to the point where I'm not even sure if these characters are at all developed - perhaps they just have a lot of informed traits.

It gets difficult to tell when Hinton feels the need to inform us of every single thing about them. This device isn't just a lazy way out of using subtlety, it's also an active barrier to letting us connect to these characters.

There's no way for a character to feel like a real person when their character traits are being constantly shoved down our throats. Characterization just doesn't work that way.

Allowing the reader to do some work in picking up on character traits is essential in keeping the reader engaged - without that, there's no reason for the reader to stay interested. It doesn't help that the plot is so meandering and flimsy. There's no overarching conflict here, just a bunch of barely-related plot threads.

There's just no forward motion behind this book. The characterization doesn't provide it, and neither does the plot.

There's no real tension, no buildup to any sort of real or emotional climax. Things in this book kind of just happen, often never to be brought up again. Hinton just doesn't seem to have a good idea of what she wants to say here.

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Many of the plot threads have potential themes that could arise from them, but there's no one idea that unites the whole book. That's probably the biggest strength that The Outsiders has compared to this novel.

In The Outsiders, Hinton knew exactly what she wanted to say, and everything in the novel built up to that set of ideas. Here, Hinton has no idea what she wants to say, so she has nothing to build the novel around. That's why it ends up so cheap and flimsy. This isn't a horrible novel. Bryon's voice is functionally identical to Ponyboy's, but it at least makes the setting feel immersive. And Hinton definitely does write dialogue well, even if it feels extremely dated today.

But there's not much reason to read this novel. He gets a job. One night, Bryon and Mark finally hang out by themselves again. They pick up a drunk Angela Shepard, now married, who reminisces with them. When she passes out, Mark cuts off all of her long hair.

Mark also starts bringing income, and Bryon does not want to know where it comes from. Mark stays with the injured Bryon, and desires revenge—however, Bryon realizes that, just like Mike, he does not hate his attackers. They find him just having gone on a very bad LSD trip: They take him to the hospital, where Mr. Carlson meets up with them. He calls the police on his own best friend and brother.

Mark returns and is incredulous at what Bryon has done. The cops then come and take him away. He tries to visit Mark, but Mark has been causing trouble, and so it takes a while for him to finally get to see him. In the meantime, he finds out that Cathy is dating Ponyboy. Continue reading Show less Is it any good?

It's a superior effort, one that even extremely reluctant readers understand and enjoy. Much like The Outsider, this book examines friendship and loyalty. But in this case, the main character, Bryon, turns in his best friend, Mark, to the police.

It's a major transformation for Bryon, who states throughout the book that he hates cops. Unlike Mark, Bryon tires of the constant violence of his neighborhood.Allow this favorite library to be seen by others Keep this favorite library private. As is the case in all noir books everything explodes at the end because hip kids never win and squares a Coming of age story that's equal parts "The Hustler", "Rumble Fish" and the Jack Kerouac-Neal Cassady bromance legends.

Doing so kept reminding me of the writer manipulating the text and her own outward concerns with an audience of teens and the publishing world, which, in those moments, kept getting in the way of the novel's otherwise sincere attempts at telling difficult truths as honestly as possible. Teenagers love the gritty realism of this novel and the story of a boy's inner turmoil. Well, they wouldn't be possible without Hinton's influence.

Aug 17, Laura rated it liked it Shelves: Bryon, my man, let me give you some anything-but-friendly advice: Carlson meets up with them. There's just no forward motion behind this book. New York:

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